Month: March 2018

LibreOffice Writer, Word 2016 offer many list styles for document designers

The addition of lists to word processors have helped writers keep their readers engaged in their articles and other documents. Different documents have different themes, and many word processors have different styles of bullets and numbering to fit with the variety of documents.

Bullets and numbering lists break down information in documents and make them easier to read. Bullets and numbering can be combined to create multilevel lists.

LibreOffice and Microsoft Word have various styles and features for bulleted and numbering lists. This article will compare list styles for LibreOffice Writer and Microsoft Word 2016 for Windows.

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LibreOffice allows for quicker table modification than Word

Tables are one of the most integral parts of a document. Common advice is to plan a table, so you know how many columns and rows you need.

However, many times you receive more data and need to add rows. Data parameters also change, so you need to add columns and create new categories.

Documents are also designed with tables. When designs need to change columns and rows in those tables also will need to change.

Most word processors offer easy ways to add columns and rows to tables.This article will examine how to add columns and rows in LibreOffice Writer and Microsoft Word 2016 for Windows are inserted or deleted.

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Word gives table designers many more options than LibreOffice

word processor

word processor

Tables have been part of word processors for decades. They are useful for breaking up a wall of text with a graphic element. They are good for taking data from a report or another document and making it easy to find.

They are also used for document design. You can make a complex layout for a page by creating a table. However, most word processors have other tools, such as text boxes, for laying out a page and document.

Two of the most robust word processors are Microsoft Word and LibreOffice Writer. Both allow for the creation of complex tables.

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LibreOffice makes it easy for programmers by allowing macros to be written in four languages

The best macros are not recorded through the user interface of an application. They are hard coded through the application’s coding interface.

In the last blog, I compared recording macros in LibreOffice to doing the same in Microsoft Office. In this article we will compare how each one handles macros in general.

Most Microsoft power users are familiar with macros in Office. The famous office suite uses Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). It has been part of it for two decades, being based on Visual Basic 6.0.

LibreOffice, by default, uses LibreOffice Basic, an open-source scripting language that was taken from OpenOffice.org. Most programmers are not familiar with this language, so LibreOffice uses other languages that are familiar to many programmers.

The open-source suite uses JavaScript, Python, and BeanShell to create macros in addition to LibreOffice Basic.

This article will focus on creating new macros in LibreOffice and the Windows and Mac versions of Microsoft Office.

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